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The NW Alliance Portal
to the NY Times!    

http://www.ThePortlandAlliance.org/nytpa


Top News
A member of the Ladies in White dissident group being carried by officers after the police broke up a demonstration by the group.
Obama Lands in Cuba With a Pledge to Listen to Its People

By DAMIEN CAVE and JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

Cuba, a police state working out how much to open up to the world and to its own people, has gone above and beyond to prevent embarrassing surprises.

Colby Bledsoe, left, campaign manager for FreedomWorks for America, with Jason Pye, director of communications of FreedomWorks, at the FreedomWorks offices on Capitol Hill on Thursday.
First Step in Conservatives' Supreme Court Fight: Agreeing on a Message

By ERIC LIPTON

The factions opposing Merrick B. Garland's nomination to the Supreme Court are split over whether to attack him directly or steer the debate away from his merits.

A Peabody Energy coal mine in Wyoming. The company announced last week that it might have to file for bankruptcy.
As Coal's Future Grows Murkier, Banks Pull Financing

By MICHAEL CORKERY

After helping to drive Wall Street's profits for generations, the coal industry is in a free fall, and even daring investors are reluctant to risk trying to save it.

 Editors' Picks

The Cuban national baseball team and the Baltimore Orioles met in Havana for the first of their two exhibition games in 1999.

SPORTS

When M.L.B. Broke the Ice With a Game in Havana

By DAVID WALDSTEIN

Ahead of the Tampa Bay Rays playing in Havana on Tuesday, a look back at the Baltimore Orioles' exhibition game against the Cuban national baseball team in 1999.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The Prison-Commercial Complex

By CHANDRA BOZELKO

The way that phone companies gouge inmates is criminal.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"The government of Cuba is like a father. Strong, but worried about the family."

CARLOS ALZUGARAY TRETO, a former Cuban diplomat, on how Cubans of all ideologies are expected to behave during President Obama's three-day stay.

Today's Videos
Video VIDEO: A Change of Heart

The artificial heart became a media sensation in the 1980s as it both raised hopes and spread controversy. Today, its impact on medical science is still playing out in surprising ways.

Video VIDEO: ISIS's Signature Explosive in Europe

Triacetone triperoxide, which was used in the Paris attacks in November, has become ISIS's explosive of choice in Europe. Specialists in bomb detection explain why.

World
Terry O'Connor, the manager of the port in Darwin, in the Northern Territory of Australia, that was leased to a Chinese company in October for $361 million.
U.S. Casts Wary Eye on Australian Port Leased by Chinese

By JANE PERLEZ

Critics contend that the Chinese bought a front-row seat to spy on naval operations at the port of Darwin, which serves as a host base for the United States Marines.

Migrants reaching the Greek island of Lesbos on Sunday.
Greece Struggles to Enforce Migrant Accord on First Day

By LIZ ALDERMAN

After a European Union deal with Turkey took effect, migrants by the hundreds continued to reach the Greek islands, where processing centers were not yet adequately staffed.

Iain Duncan Smith, who oversaw work and pensions policy in David Cameron's cabinet. Mr. Duncan Smith resigned on Friday.
Tensions Rise in David Cameron's Government Over E.U. Vote

By STEPHEN CASTLE

The prime minister faces deepening fissures in his government, underscoring the risk that his party could be damaged over Britain's ties to the Continent.

U.S.
The president and Michelle Obama in Old Havana on Sunday.
Cubans Pack the Streets for a Glimpse of President Obama

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS and DAMIEN CAVE

The president's visit, the first by an American leader in nearly nine decades, holds the potential to exorcise one of the last ghosts of the Cold War.

A part of the elevated rail transit system in Kapolei, Hawaii.
Hawaii Struggles to Keep Rail Project From Becoming a Boondoggle

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

Critics of Honolulu's elevated rail system, which is two years behind schedule, say too much effort and taxpayer money have been spent to give up on the plan now.

Dr. William C. DeVries performed the first successful artificial implantation of an artificial heart in 1982.
Artificial Hearts Ticking Along Decades After Jarvik-7 Debate

By CLYDE HABERMAN

A device first tried in 1982 extended lives but raised ethical questions. While its descendants are used only as temporary "bridges" to transplants, regulators are mulling the possibility of again approving permanent implants.

Politics
Mr. Trump speaking to the Republican Jewish Coalition in Washington in December.
Donald Trump Courts Wary Jewish Voters

By JONATHAN MAHLER

Donald J. Trump, whose disregard for the sensitivities of various religious and ethnic groups has hit a nerve among Jewish organizations, faces a difficult sell Monday.

Donald J. Trump campaigned in Salt Lake City on Friday.
Donald Trump Is Finally Uniting Top Republican Donors - Against Him

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and RACHEL SHOREY

Wealthy conservatives are helping pay for a series of last-ditch efforts to wound Mr. Trump, disclosures filed on Sunday night revealed.

Volunteers made calls for Hillary Clinton last Tuesday at a phone bank in Lake Worth, Fla. Mrs. Clinton has had success attracting older Americans to vote for her this primary season.
Older Voters May Be Hillary Clinton's Answer to Bernie Sanders's Youth Appeal

By AMY CHOZICK

Mr. Sanders's message has made him the choice of the Snapchat generation, but Mrs. Clinton is doing fine counting on voters who came of age with Polaroids.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
An Amazon Prime drone. Airline and pilots groups have said opening the skies to more commercial drones could create safety risks.
Amazon Leans on Government in Its Quest to Be a Delivery Powerhouse

By CECILIA KANG

New uses for commercial drones, 33-foot trucks, improved roads and bridges: Amazon and its lobbyists urge officials to support expansion efforts.

Sean Parker, a technology investor, is backing the Screening Room start-up.
Hollywood Divided Over Movie Streaming Service

By BROOKS BARNES

The Screening Room, a start-up supported by AMC, wants consumers to pay $50 to rent big-budget movies on the same day they arrive in theaters.

Sherwin-Williams aims to pay $113 a share in cash for Valspar, nearly 35 percent higher than its closing price on Friday.
Sherwin-Williams to Buy Valspar for $9.3 Billion

By MICHAEL J. de la MERCED

The companies, two of the biggest names in paints, said they did not expect problems with antitrust regulators.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Mark Zuckerberg, right, the chief executive of Facebook, at the China Development Forum in Beijing on Sunday.
Seeking Access to Facebook in China, Zuckerberg Courts Risks

By PAUL MOZUR

The founder of the social networking service has learned Mandarin and charmed audiences. But with a public presence in China comes official scrutiny.

Apple vs. the F.B.I.: How the Case Could Play Out

The New York Times reporters Katie Benner, who covers technology, and Matt Apuzzo, who covers national security, debate the iPhone case as it heads to a hearing.

BITS

Flinging Emojis, Twitch Chatters Revel as Julia Child Cooks

By NICK WINGFIELD

This was the second time Twitch, a video streaming site, turned to a dead public television icon to branch out from its usual game-heavy content.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Kentucky guard Jamal Murray sent an arrow flying to the Wildcats' bench during a first-round victory over Stony Brook.
College Sharpshooters Add Theatrics to Their Quivers

By MARC TRACY

In the N.C.A.A. tournament, a successful 3-point shot can elicit an elaborate pantomime involving a bow and arrow.

Rex Pflueger, center, was mobbed by teammates after the Irish became the fifth A.C.C. team to advance to the Round of 16.

ANALYSIS

N.C.A.A. Favorites End a Few Charmed Runs

By ZACH SCHONBRUN

Upstarts with lower seeds, lower profiles, and representing smaller conferences, largely hit a wall Sunday in the tournament, where most of the top seeds again prevailed.

Victoria Azarenka, right, and Serena Williams had some fun after Azarenka received the winner's trophy.
Anger After Official Says WTA Players Ride on 'Coattails' of Men

By BEN ROTHENBERG

Remarks by the director of the BNP Paribas Open overshadowed Victoria Azarenka's defeat of Serena Williams, 6-4, 6-4, in the women's final.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts

CRITIC'S NOTEBOOK

SXSW: From Exclusive Performances to Cellphone Souvenirs

By JON PARELES

The initial lure of South by Southwest in 1987 was site-specific and ephemeral; now this music festival generates content for people who don't have to be there.

Review: 'The Effect,' About Falling in Love While Taking Antidepressants

By BEN BRANTLEY

Lucy Prebble's play at the Barrow Street Theater centers on a young man and woman who question their emotions during a four-week pharmaceutical trial.

Julie Kent on Her Plans for Showcasing Washington Dancers

By GIA KOURLAS

Ms. Kent says her role as artistic director at Washington Ballet is all about embracing change.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
New York
New York City Fights Scavengers Over a Treasure: Trash

By SARAH MASLIN NIR

As the city sets new recycling goals, it is cracking down on people and teams who pick metals, cardboard and plastic from the trash and cash them in.

Mr. Reid, 43, talked of opening a restaurant in Florida with his wife, whom he married six months ago.
Queens Bouncer With Imposing Physique Is Remembered as a Peacemaker

By RICK ROJAS

Elsworth Reid, 43, died this month after trying to break up a fight at a restaurant in the South Ozone Park neighborhood.

Alisha King, 31, with her son Liam, 2, in the courtyard. Ms. King used to take two trains to a Manhattan clinic for hormone therapy and mental health counseling. The new center in the Bronx will offer multiple services in one location.
For Transgender New Yorkers, a Center of Their Own in the Bronx

By WINNIE HU

The Bronx Trans Collective will be the city's first major multiservice center specifically for transgender people, offering programs and services that were previously scattered across different sites.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Media & Advertising
Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., before Donald Trump's primary election night news conference on March 15.

MEDIATOR

The Mutual Dependence of Donald Trump and the News Media

By JIM RUTENBERG

While Mr. Trump's presidential bid benefits from constant coverage, that coverage is also a lifeline to news outlets as they jockey for survival.

Nick Denton, the founder of Gawker, in a Florida courtroom before a jury awarded Hulk Hogan damages for Gawker's posting of a sex tape.

NEWS ANALYSIS

Self-Correcting Beyond a Web Era Marked by Sensationalism

By JOHN HERRMAN

By the time a jury awarded Hulk Hogan damages from Gawker for its publication of a sex tape, the site and others were already self-correcting in the direction of privacy.

ADVERTISING

Kraft Reveals Revamped Mac and Cheese, 50 Million Boxes Later

By MARTHA C. WHITE

Last year Kraft reformulated its macaroni and cheese without artificial dyes or preservatives. Months later, the company told the public it had made the switch.

For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media »
Obituaries
Geoffrey H. Hartman at Sterling Memorial Library at Yale in 1997.
Geoffrey H. Hartman, Scholar Who Saw Literary Criticism as Art, Dies at 86

By MARGALIT FOX

Long associated with the Yale School of criticism, Professor Hartman examined a wide range of subjects, including Wordsworth, Judaica and trauma.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »
Editorial

EDITORIAL

Religion and Birth Control at the Supreme Court

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

The Obama administration has bent over backward to accommodate religious objectors, but they won't take yes for an answer.

President Obama meeting with Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef of Saudi Arabia at the White House in 2015.

EDITORIAL

A Presidential Rebuke to the Saudis

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

President Obama has forced a conversation about the increasingly troubled American-Saudi relationship into the open.

The Chinese central bank in Beijing.

EDITORIAL

Chinese Problems on America's Shores

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

As money rushes in to the United States, regulators should be thinking about the lessons of the 2008 financial crisis.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed

OP-ED COLUMNIST

Learning Lessons From Outrage

By CHARLES M. BLOW

The current political crisis shows that we must constantly struggle for what we choose to be as a country.

OP-ED COLUMNIST

On Invincible Ignorance

By PAUL KRUGMAN

The Republican Party may be in for some soul-searching, but so far its leaders remain in denial.

President Enrique Pena Nieto of Mexico

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

What Mexico Thinks About Trump

By IOAN GRILLO

The candidate's angry words destroy relations with America's Southern neighbor?


Top News
Supporters for Senator Marco Rubio at an event in The Villages, Fla., on Sunday.
Ohio Looms Large in Both Races on Tuesday

By TRIP GABRIEL

A primary victory by Gov. John Kasich in his home state would toughen Donald J. Trump's path to the Republican nomination, while Democratic Senator Bernie Sanders seeks a repeat of his Michigan upset.

A Fight for the Future protest on Feb. 23 drew about a dozen people to F.B.I. offices in Washington.
In the Apple Case, a Debate Over Data Hits Home

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR, DAVID E. SANGER and KATIE BENNER

The debate that began three years ago after revelations about government surveillance has become more personal, now that smartphones are involved.

Quiet Support for Saudis Entangles U.S. in Yemen

By MARK MAZZETTI and ERIC SCHMITT

The Obama administration has quietly supported the Saudi-led war in Yemen, even as American officials see a bloody quagmire there.

For more top news, go to NYTimes.com »
Editors' Picks
A Confederate monument outside the Alabama State Capitol in Montgomery.

U.S.

Momentum to Remove Confederate Symbols Slows or Stops

By ALAN BLINDER

Less than nine months after the massacre of black churchgoers in South Carolina, the pendulum swings back in favor of the battle flag and other icons of Southern history.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

North Carolina and the Politics of Barbecue

By JOHN SHELTON REED

How a candidate handles the all-important question of well-cooked meat can mean victory or defeat in the Tar Heel State.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"This is one of those moments that defines what's next. Will technology companies protect the privacy of their users or will they do work for the U.S. government? You can't do both."

MALKIA CYRIL, the executive director of the Center for Media Justice, on the battle between Apple and the Justice Department.

World
A Jarawa man fashioned an arrowhead by shaping a piece of foraged metal in 2002. The Jarawas are one of India's last intact Paleolithic tribes.
A Killing Tests India's Protection of an Aboriginal Culture

By ELLEN BARRY and HARI KUMAR

India has a "hands-off" policy toward hunter-gatherer tribes like the Jarawas. But what happens when a murder inquiry brings the police into an isolated society?

A blast in the heart of Ankara killing more than 30 was the latest in a string of attacks that have destabilized the country.
Explosion in Ankara Kills at Least 34, Turkish Officials Say

By CEYLAN YEGINSU

The blast in Turkey's capital, less than a month after a bombing on a military convoy in the city, was believed to have been caused by a car bomb.

Christian Democrats awaiting results of regional elections at party headquarters in Berlin.
Setback for Angela Merkel as Far Right Makes Gains in Germany

By ALISON SMALE

As three states voted, the ascendance of the Alternative for Germany pointed to strains from the chancellor's policy of accepting refugees.

U.S.
Jacai Colson, 28, a four-year veteran of the Prince George's County police force, was killed in the attack on Sunday.
Maryland Shooting Outside Police Station Leaves One Officer Dead

By LIAM STACK

Two suspects were in custody in connection with the assault that killed a four-year veteran of the Prince George's County police force.

White House staff members sorting mail in the Office of Presidential Correspondence in Washington. President Obama typically receives about 7,000 letters a day, mostly via email.

WHITE HOUSE LETTER

Obama Often Depends on Mail to Tell His Story

By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS

Around the White House, they're known as the 10 LADs - the 10 letters a day President Obama insists on reading, and sometimes using to make a point.

Father of Boy Killed Last Year in Chicago Is Arrested on Shooting Charges

By ELI ROSENBERG

The Chicago police said that a man, whose son Tyshawn Lee was killed in an alley in November, was identified as having shot two men and a woman as part of what they called "gang activity."

Politics
Gov. John Kasich spoke to supporters on Sunday at the Ehrnfelt Recreation Center in Strongsville, Ohio.
John Kasich Boasts of Ohio Recovery, but Reality Is More Nuanced

By THOMAS KAPLAN

The presidential candidate closed Ohio's budget shortfall in part by cutting aid to local governments, forcing some of them to raise taxes or cut services.

A protester at a Donald J. Trump rally last month in Virginia as his head of security, Keith Schiller, approached her from behind.
For Donald Trump, 'Get 'Em Out' Is the New 'You're Fired'

By ALAN RAPPEPORT and MAGGIE HABERMAN

As Donald Trump's campaign events have grown more vitriolic, the security presence surrounding the Republican front-runner has become increasingly on edge.

Senator Harry Reid in his office on Capitol Hill. Mr. Reid is retiring at the end of this year.
For Harry Reid, the Supreme Court Vacancy Offers One Last Fight

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN

Supporters of the senator, who is retiring this year, say he is prepared for an intense fight with Republicans over a new member of the court.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
The Federal Reserve chairwoman Janet L. Yellen at a hearing in February.
Fed's Plans to Raise Interest Rates Are Delayed, Not Derailed

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

The challenge is to forge consensus among Federal Reserve officials about when to resume the march begun in December, when the central bank raised rates for the first time since the financial crisis.

A Valeant trading post at the New York Stock Exchange in November. Valeant's stock price has fallen to less than $70 from over $225.
Valeant, Woes Rising, Backs Away From Boldness to Calm Investors

By KATIE THOMAS

The drug maker, which made big profits by raising the price of old drugs, is now talking about investing in research and paying down debt as its stock price slumps.

The flags of Puerto Rico and the United States flying in front of a UBS bank building in the Hato Rey financial district in San Juan.
Democrats' Bills to Empower Puerto Rico Face Uphill Battle

By MARY WILLIAMS WALSH

Elements of the bills will probably meet stiff opposition from Republicans, who have expressed concern over any island-wide debt restructuring.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Rebecca Lynn is among the top 20 venture capital investors, a list dominated by early-stage investors.
Top Start-Up Investors Are Betting on Growth, Not Waiting for It

By KATIE BENNER and MICHAEL J. de la MERCED

Early-stage investors, the venture capitalists who identify and fund a promising company at its infancy, often reap the greatest returns.

Wendy Davis, a former Texas state senator, was among the speakers at a daylong series of events at South by Southwest in Austin, Tex., on online sexual harassment.

BITS

SXSW Addresses Online Harassment of Women in Gaming

By CONOR DOUGHERTY and MIKE ISAAC

At a daylong meeting at the South by Southwest conference, panelists in the gaming industry discussed attacks against them, including death threats.

Modeled After Ants, Teams of Tiny Robots Can Move 2-Ton Car

By JOHN MARKOFF

Researchers are exploring the limits of friction in the design of tiny robots that can pull thousands of times their weight, wander like gecko lizards on vertical surfaces or mimic bats.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Shabazz Napier, center, and his Connecticut teammates in 2014 after winning an N.C.A.A. tournament title, one of four for the team in the last 20 years.

SPORTS BUSINESS

Football Drags on UConn's Power 5 Ambitions

By JOE NOCERA

Connecticut's curse is to be a great basketball university in a football-centric world, where the major conferences earn big money on lucrative TV contracts.

For Buddy Hield and Other Bahamians, Talent Is Cultivated on the Great Plains

By MARC TRACY

Sunrise Christian Academy in Wichita, Kan., attracts many elite basketball players, especially from the Bahamas, the home of Buddy Hield of Oklahoma.

Maria Sharapova's positive test of meldonium has driven much of the global interest in the substance. The number of positive tests is expected to soar well past 100 this week.
Wave of Positive Tests for Meldonium Adds to Doping Crisis

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

At least 99 athletes have tested positive for the drug, according to the World Anti-Doping Agency, startling officials over its widespread use.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
Books by Elena Ferrante in translation.
Who Is Elena Ferrante? An Educated Guess Causes a Stir

By RACHEL DONADIO

An article in an Italian newspaper suggested that a professor in Naples is the author of the popular novels, who writes under a pseudonym. She denied the report.

Review: 'Iolanta' and 'The Nutcracker,' Reunited Naturalistically at the Paris Opera

By ZACHARY WOOLFE

Dmitri Tcherniakov's production reconstructs these two tales of a female heroine's awakening, while stripping "The Nutcracker" of its sugarplum sweetness.

Bill Cosby, center, outside the Montgomery County District Court in Norristown, Pa., in February.
To Defray His Legal Costs in Defamation Suits, Cosby Turns to His Insurance

By GRAHAM BOWLEY and SYDNEY EMBER

As Bill Cosby faces lawsuits from women, he has turned to his insurer, American International Group, which has challenged his claims.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
New York
The Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics plant in Hoosick Falls, N.Y. State officials have linked the PFOA in Hoosick Falls to the factory, where the chemical was once used in making Teflon products.
Pollutant Is Removed From Water in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., Cuomo Says

By JESSE McKINLEY

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo visited the village and said a new filter system had cleared a toxic chemical known as PFOA from the municipal water supply.

Family and friends of Timothy Conklin, 29, a crewman aboard the Specialist, waited at Pierson Park in Tarrytown, N.Y., on Sunday before Mr. Conklin's body was recovered.
Body of Second Crew Member Is Recovered From Tugboat Crash Near Tappan Zee Bridge

By SARAH MASLIN NIR and ANNIE CORREAL

The body of Timothy Conklin, 29, of Westbury, Long Island, was recovered while the search continued for a third missing crew member who is presumed dead.

Those accused in connection with an inmate's beating on Rikers Island last July: Top row from left: Eliseo Perez, retired assistant chief; Officer Jose Parra; Officer Alfred Rivera; Officer Tobias Parker; and Capt. Michael Pollard; bottom row from left, Officer David Rodriguez; Officer Jeffrey Richard; Officer Harmon Frierson; Officer Dwayne Maynard; and Capt. Gerald Vaughn.
Trial of 10 Rikers Officers Charged in '12 Inmate Beating Is Set to Begin

By WINNIE HU

Prosecutors allege a cover-up linked to the brutal attack on Jahmal Lightfoot, whose nose and eye sockets were fractured.

For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Media & Advertising
Politics Invades Hollywood

By MICHAEL CIEPLY

In an election year, the only real "October surprise" from Hollywood would be a complete political blackout. But don't worry. It won't happen.

Cheryl Boone Isaacs leads the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.
Film Academy Governors Take On Race and Ratings

By MICHAEL CIEPLY and BROOKS BARNES

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science governing board will wrestle with a lack of diversity in its ranks and with poor ratings for the Feb. 28 Oscars telecast.

Anthology TV Can Draw Higher-Level Actors, FX Executive Says

By JOHN KOBLIN

A discussion about why shows like "American Crime story" and "Fargo," which change settings, characters and story lines each season, are here to stay.

For more media and advertising news, go to NYTimes.com/Media »
Editorial
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel last week at a cabinet meeting in Jerusalem.

EDITORIAL

Mr. Netanyahu's Lost Opportunities

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

It's hard to understand how showing disrespect to the president of the United States serves Israel's interests.

EDITORIAL

Bus Passengers Deserve a Safe Ride

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

An increasingly popular way to travel between cities is urgently in need of more safety regulations.

Andrew McClendon, 20, has been searching for a job in Chicago for two years.

EDITORIAL

Jobs for the Young in Poor Neighborhoods

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

A program in Chicago could point the way to helping young black men and others in high-violence areas.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Ben Carson endorsed Donald Trump in a news conference at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla.

OP-ED COLUMNIST

Carson Endorses the Demagogue

By CHARLES M. BLOW

The former candidate's backing of Donald Trump shows that his calls for civility were hollow.

OP-ED COLUMNIST

Trump Is No Accident

By PAUL KRUGMAN

Republican leaders have long laid the groundwork for the current G.O.P. front-runner's strategy.

OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

The Era of Free Trade Might Be Over. That's a Good Thing.

By JARED BERNSTEIN

Globalization has meant lower prices for Americans, but it's meant lower wages, too.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

ON THIS DAY

On March 14, 1900, Congress ratified the Gold Standard Act.


U.S.
An image from a police dashboard camera shows Trooper Brian T. Encinia arresting Sandra Bland after a traffic stop in Prairie View, Tex., in July.
Texas Trooper Who Arrested Sandra Bland Is Charged With Perjury

By DAVID MONTGOMERY

A Texas grand jury indicted Trooper Brian Encinia, who arrested Sandra Bland, the Chicago-area woman who days later was found dead in her jail cell.

Equipment was in place in November to help stop the flow of natural gas leaking from a storage well at the Southern California Gas Company utility's Aliso Canyon facility.
Governor Declares Emergency Over Los Angeles Gas Leak

By IAN LOVETT

Gov. Jerry Brown, who is ordering California agencies to move quickly to resolve the long-running issue, has drawn criticism for not responding faster.

A drone pilot at a base in upstate New York.
Pentagon Will Extend Military Honors to Drone Operators Far From Battles

By MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT

The Defense Department is scheduled to announce awards to honor drone operators and those who launch cyberattacks similar to those given to pilots.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »

Top News

Obituaries

Natalie Cole performing in 2007.
Natalie Cole, 'Unforgettable' Voice, Dies at 65

By JON PARELES

Ms. Cole was a Grammy winner whose biggest hit was "Unforgettable," a virtual duet with her father, Nat King Cole, that topped the 1991 charts.

Wayne Rogers, 82, Actor in TV Show 'M.A.S.H.'

By ANITA GATES

Mr. Rogers was on the show for just the first three of its 11 seasons as the army surgeon Trapper John, but his run, and his character, are especially revered by show devotees.


President Obama in the Oval Office on Sunday night.
Obama Says of Terrorist Threat: 'We Will Overcome It'

By GARDINER HARRIS and MICHAEL D. SHEAR

In a prime-time address, President Obama bluntly acknowledged heightened worries after the attacks in Paris and in San Bernardino, Calif., and urged Americans not to give in to fear.

At the Islamic Community Center of Redlands in San Bernardino, Calif., on Sunday, prayers were written for the 14 people killed last week.
San Bernardino Community Struck by Massacre Seemed on Verge of Turnaround

By ADAM NAGOURNEY, IAN LOVETT and RICK ROJAS

The terrorist attack was another blow for this downtrodden working-class city an hour outside Los Angeles, and just at a moment when things seemed to have been improving.

Tashfeen Malik Was a 'Saudi Girl' Who Stood Out at a Pakistani University

By DECLAN WALSH

Teachers remember Ms. Malik, who was born in Pakistan but spent most of her life in Saudi Arabia, as a polite and driven student. But the timing and circumstances of her shift into militancy remain a mystery.


OPINION | Op-Ed Contributor

Don't Trust Putin on Syria

By ANDREW FOXALL

Russia's real aim is not­ to beat ISIS, but to prop up its puppet, Bashar al-Assad.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"I would really like to go to Germany. But if they don't let me go, I will consider other options, like staying in Austria or trying to go to another country. I won't stop."

ABDELKAHAR SHERZAD, a 28-year-old from Afghanistan, after hearing about new border restrictions being imposed by Germany.

 
World
Egypt Forces Kill Tourists From Mexico

By LIAM STACK

Police and military forces mistakenly shot at a Mexican tourist convoy while pursuing militants in the country's Western Desert, killing at least 12 people, officials said.

The Justice Department is pushing to extradite Inocente Orlando Montano Morales, above, in Boston in 2013, a former vice defense minister linked to a slaughter of Jesuits in 1989.
U.S. Wants Former Salvadoran Ally to Face Justice in 1989 Massacre

By JONATHAN M. KATZ

The United States government, which spent more than $4 billion in assistance to El Salvador's military during its civil war, is now working to bring some of the officers to justice.

The election of Jeremy Corbyn, a leftist outsider, as the Labour Party leader is seen as a boon to Conservatives and their expected next leader.

Memo From Britain

Labour Party's Jeremy Corbyn May Help Tories in Next British Elections

By STEVEN ERLANGER

It is difficult to imagine a British electorate that just handed Conservatives a majority turning to a party that has moved so far to the left by electing their new leader, Mr. Corbyn.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
U.S.
One Symptom in New Medical Codes: Doctor Anxiety

By ROBERT PEAR

Under the new coding regime, government programs and private insurers will require doctors, hospitals, clinics and nursing homes to report vastly more information about the care they provide patients.

Moving Fast, Fire Scorches Community in California

By IAN LOVETT and ASHLEY SOUTHALL

Two wildfires north of San Francisco had burned through more than 100,000 acres and destroyed at least 1,000 homes and commercial structures, according to state officials.

Panel Studying Racial Divide in Missouri Presents a Blunt Picture of Inequity

By MONICA DAVEY

A commission appointed by the governor after the death of Michael Brown is calling for sweeping changes on matters of policing, the courts, education, health care, housing and more.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US »
Politics
Jeb Bush's Cerebral Debate Style Faces a Test: Donald Trump

By MICHAEL BARBARO

In rigorous practice sessions for Wednesday's Republican debate, Mr. Bush has been preparing pointed responses to Mr. Trump's most frequent insults.

Ben Carson with Phyllis Schlafly, the founder of the Eagle Forum, after speaking at an event hosted by the conservative group in St. Louis on Friday.
Ben Carson Works His Way Up the Donation Ladder

By ERIC LICHTBLAU and TRIP GABRIEL

A soft-spoken Republican candidate who apparently had stage fright in the first debate is gaining confidence and wealthier donors.

First Draft

Ad Contrasts Ronald Reagan's Views With Republicans' Words on Immigration

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

The ad from a pro-immigration group is timed to this week's Republican presidential debate and features clips showing Mr. Reagan's upbeat tone in welcoming people to the United States.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »
Business
Rivalry Builds Off the Field as Talent Agencies Turn to Sports

By MICHAEL CIEPLY and BROOKS BARNES

With the movie and television businesses facing an uncertain future, Creative Artists Agency and William Morris Endeavor are going all in on athletics.

Cambodian fishermen last year in Songkhla, Thailand. Many work in slavery-like conditions.
Consumers and Lawmakers Take Steps to End Forced Labor in Fishing

By IAN URBINA

Citing a recent New York Times series on lawlessness at sea, lawmakers have asked fishing and pet food companies to increase transparency and accountability in their labor practices.

Diane Weyermann, Jeffrey Skoll and Jonathan King took five Participant Media films to the Toronto International Film Festival.
Participant Media Delivers Batch of Films and Unfolds DreamWorks Idea

By MICHAEL CIEPLY

Jeffrey Skoll hopes to conclude a deal between Participant, his 11-year-old activist entertainment company, and Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks Studios.

For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »
Technology
Molly Goodall with her son, Carter, whose refusal to wear hoods on his jackets inspired her to begin designing coats to sell on Etsy.
Etsy Welcomes Manufacturers to Artisanal Fold

By HIROKO TABUCHI

With Etsy Manufacturing, the online marketplace plans to connect sellers and small manufacturers that meet certain production and workplace criteria.

Joshua Motta, left, Carmen Chang and Matthew Prince in the San Francisco offices of the security start-up CloudFlare.
Partnership Boosts Users Over China's Great Firewall

By PAUL MOZUR

The Chinese search giant Baidu and CloudFlare, a start-up based in San Francisco, have joined in an unusual business arrangement to speed Internet traffic into and out of China.

Eddy Cue of Apple announcing features of the revamped Apple TV last week.

Bits Blog

TV Bundles Challenge Apple to Make a Deal

By KATIE BENNER

A new version of the Apple TV device has a lot more capabilities than earlier versions. But getting television shows on the device is a challenge.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »
Sports
Novak Djokovic earned his second United States Open trophy. With 10 major singles titles, he is tied with Bill Tilden for seventh on the career list.
Novak Djokovic Defeats Roger Federer to Win U.S. Open

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

After stopping Federer's momentum in four sets in this year's Wimbledon final, Djokovic did the same, earning a second U.S. Open singles title and a 10th Grand Slam singles title.

Browns quarterback Josh McCown fumbling near the Jets' goal line during the first quarter. The Jets wound up with the football, and McCown left the game with a concussion.

Jets 31, Browns 10

Big Win but Bigger Worries for Jets

By BEN SHPIGEL

Cornerback Antonio Cromartie and linebacker Lorenzo Mauldin were hurt during the game.

Malone, right, with Julius Erving after the 76ers defeated the Lakers for the 1983 N.B.A. championship.
Moses Malone, 76ers' 'Chairman of the Boards,' Dies at 60

By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN

Malone, a three-time league M.V.P., was the first modern player to go straight from high school to the pros when he made his A.B.A. debut in 1974.

For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »
Arts
The musician Jenny Hval performed in a wig with teal highlights at Basilica Soundscape, a festival of music, art, poetry and style in Hudson, N.Y.

Critic's Notebook

Basilica Soundscape: A Festival of Pop, Punk and So Much Else

By NATE CHINEN

A weekend-long festival of music, art, poetry and style, this event celebrates music that aims beyond the visible horizon.

From left, Alex Shiozaki, Rebecca Krohn and Amar Ramasar at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Critic's Notebook

Review: Arvo Pärt and 9/11, Paired at the Metropolitan Museum

By JAMES R. OESTREICH

The Temple of Dendur - though unloved by musicians for its acoustics - only enhanced a sense of quasi-religious ritual.

Distractions: Snapping a photograph with an iPad after a performance at Carnegie Hall.

Critic's Notebook

The Concert Hall as Refuge in a Restless, Web-Driven World

By ANTHONY TOMMASINI

A case can be made for classical music as a tonic for an increasingly wired society.

For more arts news, go to NYTimes.com/Arts »
New York
Subway Station for 7 Line Opens on Far West Side

By EMMA G. FITZSIMMONS

The station, at 34th Street and 11th Avenue, opened to the public on Sunday afternoon when regularly scheduled No. 7 trains started rolling through.

Mr. de Blasio held a news conference in New York in December after hosting a summit meeting on immigration reform with other mayors.
Cities United, de Blasio's Immigration Coalition, Has Big Goals but Modest Start

By ALEXANDER BURNS

Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York founded the group with lofty aspirations, but progress has been stymied by politics and the logistical difficulties of coordinating action across dozens of cities.

Jimmy Neary with the watch given to him in 1990 by Gen. Douglas MacArthur's personal pilot.

Grace Notes

A Watch With Lifetime Access to Ebbets Field Has Mysterious Origins

By JAMES BARRON

A gold watch offering admittance to Ebbets Field in Brooklyn once belonged to Gen. Douglas MacArthur's pilot, but no one knows where it came from.

. More Grace Notes Columns
For more New York news, go to NYTimes.com/NewYork »
Obituaries
William Becker in 1995.
William Becker, Who Transformed Janus Films, Dies at 88

By SAM ROBERTS

Mr. Becker, a culturally minded businessman, acquired Janus Films in 1965 with a partner, and they vastly expanded its library and broadened its distribution.

Stanley Hoffmann at Harvard.
Stanley Hoffmann, Who Brought Passion to Foreign Policy Analysis, Dies at 86

By WILLIAM GRIMES

Mr. Hoffmann taught at Harvard for more than half a century and wrote a series of influential books that explored international relations.

The playwright Frank D. Gilroy in New York in 1991.
Frank D. Gilroy, Playwright Behind 'The Subject Was Roses,' Dies at 89

By ROBERT D. McFADDEN

Mr. Gilroy won a Pulitzer Prize, a Tony and a Drama Critics' Circle Award for that play, his 1964 Broadway debut, but it was his only major theatrical success.

For more obituaries, go to NYTimes.com/Obituaries »
Editorials

Editorial

Regulators Need to Scrutinize Health Insurance Mergers

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Antitrust regulators should make sure that mergers in the health care industry do not reduce choices.

The Internal Revenue Service Building in Washington, D.C.

Editorial

Collecting Taxes Is Government Work

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Private tax collection is a bad idea, and it should be kept out of a highway bill.

Donald Trump piñatas for sale in San Francisco.

Editorial Observer

Latinos for Donald Trump

By ERNESTO LONDOÑO

Donald Trump's xenophobic campaign could be the jolt that unleashes the potential of the Latino electorate.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »
Op-Ed
Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke at Benedict College in Columbia,  S.C., on Saturday.

Op-Ed Columnist

Bernie Sanders and the Black Vote

By CHARLES M. BLOW

The presidential candidate has an uphill climb against the far greater name recognition of Hillary Clinton.

Op-Ed Columnist

Labour's Dead Center

By PAUL KRUGMAN

In contrast to the new leader of the British party, its moderates bought into conservative economic nonsense about the need for austerity.

Op-Ed Contributors

How Congress Can Help Puerto Rico

By CLAYTON P. GILLETTE and DAVID A. SKEEL Jr.

Bankruptcy should be allowed for the island's municipalities.

For more opinion, go to NYTimes.com/Opinion »

Metro Areas With the Largest,
and Smallest, Gay Populations

Metropolitan areas with the highest rates of L.G.B.T. residents
San Francisco 6.2%
Portland, Ore. 5.4%
Austin, Tex. 5.3%
New Orleans 5.1%
Boston 4.8%
Seattle 4.8%
Salt Lake City 4.7%
Denver 4.6%
Hartford 4.6%
Los Angeles 4.6%
Louisville, Ky. 4.5%
Providence, R.I. 4.4%
Virginia Beach 4.4%
Columbus, Ohio 4.3%
Jacksonville 4.3%

Metropolitan areas with the lowest rates of L.G.B.T. residents
Birmingham, Ala. 2.6%
Pittsburgh 3.0%
Memphis 3.1%
Cincinnati 3.2%
Raleigh, N.C. 3.2%
San Jose, Calif. 3.2%
Houston 3.3%
Milwaukee 3.5%
Nashville 3.5%
Oklahoma City 3.5%
Richmond, Va. 3.5%
Kansas City* 3.6%
Minneapolis-St. Paul 3.6%
St. Louis 3.6%
Cleveland 3.7%

A new analysis of Gallup survey data offers the most detailed estimates yet about where people who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender live.

The Gallup analysis finds the largest concentrations in the West — and not just in the expected places like San Francisco and Portland, Ore. Among the nation’s 50 largest metropolitan areas, Denver and Salt Lake City are also in the top 10. How could Salt Lake be there, given its well-known social conservatism? It seems to be a kind of regional capital of gay life, attracting people from other parts of Utah and the Mormon West.

On the other hand, some of the East Coast places with famous gay neighborhoods, including in New York, Miami and Washington, have a smaller percentage of their population who identify as gay — roughly average for a big metropolitan area. The least gay urban areas are in the Midwest and South.


http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/21/upshot/the-metro-areas-with-the-largest-and-smallest-gay-population.html


The Opinion Pages | Letters

Netanyahu’s Day, and Israel’s Future

To the Editor:

Re “Netanyahu Soundly Defeats Chief Rival” (front page, March 18):

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s election victory will keep an extreme right-wing government in power in Israel. Having crushed the hopes for an open-minded, enlightened, peace-inclined alternative to his government, days of darkness lie ahead, as promised by his rejectionist and fear-inducing expressions during the campaign.

The small, fanatical settlements beyond the security fence not only prevent the Palestinians from building a viable national home (well, their leadership is not exactly angelic itself), but they also prevent the creative and industrious young Israelis from building their homes as well (unless they join the bandwagon to the settlements, or leave the country).

Labor (now the Zionist Union) has never been successful as an opposition party, seemingly not having reconciled with the fact that for nearly 40 years it has not dominated Israeli politics.

To kindle a light in the darkness, it needs to present an alternative of sanity and enlightenment, an alternative to the swamps of occupation, as a forceful and persistent opposition.

EREL SHALIT
rest of story: 
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/19/opinion/netanyahus-day-and-israels-future.html


The Opinion Pages | Letter

South Sudan Conflict
Re “Sudan’s Rape of Darfur,” by George Clooney, John Prendergast and Akshaya Kumar (Op-Ed, Feb. 26):

Lack of education is often overlooked as a cause of South Sudan’s conflict. Only 27 percent are literate, and most Sudanese still hold on to ancient myths about one another, favoring tribal over national identity.

Many lack skills to find jobs or create one to care for their families, leading tribes to compete over government jobs. When one tribe has more people employed by the government than others, this can trigger accusations that spark tribal violence.

Creating new schools could bring students from different tribes together, fostering a sense of unity and nationalism. Educating South Sudan’s future leaders who can support peace and democracy and grow their economy may help provide a ray of hope in Sudan’s nightmare, which has lasted far too long.

JEFFREY H. TONEY
NATHANIEL CHOL NYOK
Union, N.J.

Dr. Toney is provost and vice president for academic affairs at Kean University, and Mr. Nyok, one of the Lost Boys of Sudan, is president and founder of Ambassadors for Change.


 
G.O.P. Race Starts in Lavish Haunts of Rich Donors

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and JONATHAN MARTIN

In one resort town after another, the Republican presidential hopefuls are making their case to exclusive gatherings of donors whose wealth was unleashed by the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision.

Opened in 1931, Attica Correctional Facility has long been the largest local employer in rural Wyoming County. More than 600 officers patrol the prison today, keeping watch over 2,240 inmates.
A Brutal Beating Wakes Attica's Ghosts

By TOM ROBBINS

Three corrections officers at the prison in western New York face gang-related assault charges after an inmate was brutally beaten.

Michael MacQueen, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement historian who has led war crimes investigations.
U.S. Seeks to Deport Bosnians Over War Crimes

By ERIC LICHTBLAU

Immigration officials are moving to deport at least 150 Bosnians living in the United States who they say took part in war crimes in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s.

 
Editors' Picks

WORLD

Nearly Halted in Sierra Leone, Ebola Makes Comeback by Sea

By SHERI FINK

Sierra Leone thought it had beaten back the disease, then two fishing boats carrying three infected mariners arrived at a wharf in February.

OPINION | Opinion

How We Learned to Kill

By TIMOTHY KUDO

In the madness of war, I saw that taking a life could be banal.

QUOTATION OF THE DAY

"Do I have rogue correction officers at Attica or Clinton or Great Meadow? Yep. Do I have to rigorously pursue those rogue officers when I find evidence that they've engaged in excessive force or have done something untoward to the inmate population? Absolutely."

ANTHONY ANNUCCI, the acting New York State corrections chief, speaking in light of assault charges against three guards at Attica prison.

 
Today's Videos
Video Video: Vows | When Illness Intrudes on Romance

A debilitating bout of Lyme disease threatened to derail Elisabeth C. Hall's budding relationship with Matthew Danzig. But Mr. Danzig was undeterred because he had already fallen in love.

Video Video: Anatomy of a Scene | ''71'

Yann Demange narrates a sequence from the film "'71."

. Related Review: '71'
U.S.
Lourdes Alcaniz and one of her four daughters, Gabriela Willoughby, 9, at their home in Lake Worth, Fla. Ms. Alcaniz, a single mother and freelance writer, receives a subsidy of $240 per month, without which she said she could not afford her health plan.
Before Justices Rule, Floridians Consider Life Without Health Subsidies

By ABBY GOODNOUGH

As the state with the most Affordable Care Act enrollees, Florida stands to feel the biggest impact if the Supreme Court strikes down the law's subsidies.

Bus commuters in downtown Seattle on Tuesday. Customers who qualify for the new program will pay $1.50 per ride, less than half the regular maximum fare.
Targeting Inequality, This Time on Public Transit

By KIRK JOHNSON

A new project in Seattle, closely watched around the nation, gives discounts on public transit to people whose household income is no more than two times the federal poverty level.

Out of Trouble, but Criminal Records Keep Men Out of Work

By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM

Men with even one past conviction on their résumés are having trouble finding jobs, and that is taking a toll on the overall labor market. 

Politics
Former Gov. Martin O'Malley of Maryland spoke at a conference hosted by the South Carolina Democratic Party in Myrtle Beach, S.C. on Saturday.
Martin O'Malley, in Veiled Jab at Hillary Clinton, Derides Politics of 'Triangulation'

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

Mr. O'Malley, the former governor of Maryland, and Mrs. Clinton may end up facing each other in the presidential primaries.

President Lyndon B. Johnson signing Medicare into law in July 1965, with Harry Truman. Behind them, from left: Lady Bird Johnson, Hubert Humphrey and Bess Truman.

The Upshot

L.B.J. and Truman: The Bond That Helped Forge Medicare

By MICHAEL BESCHLOSS

Lyndon Johnson admired Harry Truman and identified with his political career, his treatment by historians and his relationship with the public.

The Upshot

A Slippery New Rule for Gauging Fiscal Policy

By N. GREGORY MANKIW

The adoption of dynamic scoring for evaluating major changes in tax and spending policy makes sense in theory, but could create havoc in practice.

Business
Warren Buffett, chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway, at a company meeting in Omaha, Neb., last year.
In Annual Letter, More Hints, but Still No Confirmation, of a Buffett Successor

By DAVID GELLES

Warren E. Buffett repeated statements that the board of Berkshire Hathaway had identified his successor, but again he did not reveal that person's identity.

. After 50 Years, Oracle of Omaha Looks Back on Less Prescient Moves
. Warren Buffett Rails Against Investment Bankers
Mark Bertolini, the unconventional chief executive  of Aetna, the health insurer, gave thousands of the lowest-paid employees a 33 percent raise, and he has introduced popular yoga classes. His discussions were influenced, in part, by a near-fatal ski accident.
At Aetna, a C.E.O.'s Management by Mantra

By DAVID GELLES

Mark Bertolini, the chief executive of Aetna, is betting that bringing yoga, meditation and higher wages to his employees will be good business.

India's finance minister, Arun Jaitley, with budget documents Saturday in New Delhi.
India's New Budget Aims to Boost Growth

By ELLEN BARRY and NEHA THIRANI BAGRI

The first full-year budget of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government promised a major increase in public spending on infrastructure and a lowering of the corporate tax rate, but it failed to offer any dramatic reforms.

Technology
A shuttle bringing employees to Yahoo's campus.

Bits Blog

Silicon Valley Shuttle Drivers Vote to Join Union

By VINDU GOEL

The bus drivers who transport workers to the campuses of six Silicon Valley employers voted to join the Teamsters to negotiate better working conditions and wages.

Sports
Every Second Counts in Bid to Keep Sports Fans

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

In a world where attention spans are under duress and where entertainment options are proliferating, sports are increasingly focused on making the most of literally every second.

Wagner's Mike Aaman, center, a transfer from Rhode Island, in action. He recently had 23 rebounds in a game, the third highest total in Division I this season.
Top Rebounder Refuses to Surrender to His History of Concussions

By MATT GILES

Mike Aaman, a transfer from Rhode Island who was declared medically disqualified because of a history of concussions, has helped lift Wagner with his aggressive style of play.

John Hart, center, in a cart with the Braves' president, John Schuerholz, at camp last week.

On Baseball

Pioneering G.M. Is Eager to Mold Another Winner in Atlanta

By TYLER KEPNER

John Hart, formerly a general manager with the Indians and the Rangers, is fired up about resuming his position in the front office and "restarting" the Braves.

Arts
Unexpected Lessons From 'Fifty Shades of Grey'

By A. O. SCOTT

A hit movie has a lot to say about franchises adapted from literary sources.

Carey Mulligan and Bill Nighy Prepare 'Skylight' for Broadway

By ROSLYN SULCAS

David Hare's play, which has transferred from London in a production directed by Stephen Daldry, finds two former lovers reuniting.

On 'Downton Abbey,' Beware the Fish Mousse

By ROSLYN SULCAS

A look at the work of Lisa Heathcote, whose job it is to feed the Crawleys, and their servants, in a period-perfect fashion.

New York
The federal courthouse in Brooklyn where Abdurasul Hasanovich Juraboev, 24, and Akhror Saidakhmetov, 19, who were arrested and charged with plotting to join the Islamic State, were arraigned on Feb. 25.
Brooklyn Arrests Highlight Challenges in Fighting of ISIS and 'Known Wolves'

By MARC SANTORA and AL BAKER

As officials around the world grapple with the emerging security concerns posed by the Islamic State, the New York case provides one of the first public examples of how officials in the United States are approaching the threat.

From left, Geoffrey Green, Bill Brierton and Nembhard Blake working last month on the Windsor Terrace Food Coop, which is set to open March 21.
In Brooklyn, First Comes Gentrification, Then Comes a Food Co-op

By STUART MILLER

The Windsor Terrace Food Co-op is expected to open on March 21 in Brooklyn, which has become a hotbed of small co-ops in the last few years.

Big City

Decades Since Wasserstein's 'Heidi,' the Glass Proscenium Holds Fast

By GINIA BELLAFANTE

A revival of Wendy Wasserstein's Pulitzer Prize-winning play "The Heidi Chronicles" feels as relevant today as ever, especially in terms of women's success in the theater.

Travel
Remnants of the late 1800s are being spruced up and polished like new.
Regilding the Gilded Age in New York

By TONY PERROTTET

In cocktail bars, immersive theater companies and private clubs across the city, New Yorkers are keeping the decadent era alive.

The New York Hot Jazz Festival.
5 Ways to Time-Travel (and Party) in New York

By TONY PERROTTET

Anyone with a passion for the past can plunge into almost any historical period, from the Jazz Age to the Revolutionary era, for just a few dollars.

The Arthur Rimbaud Cultural Center in Harar.

Footsteps

Where Rimbaud Found Peace in Ethiopia

By RACHEL B. DOYLE

The mercurial French poet Arthur Rimbaud found a refuge from his earlier life in his 'beloved Harar,' where he became a merchant and arms dealer.

Magazine
Karl Ove Knausgaard outside a bar in Superior, Wis.
My Saga, Part 1

By KARL OVE KNAUSGAARD

The Norwegian author of the six-part autobiographical novel "My Struggle" follows the trail of the first Europeans to set foot in North America. First of two parts.

Roomy Khan was sentenced to a year in prison for insider trading.
Can a Stock-Trader-Turned-Convict Start a New Life?

By ANITA RAGHAVAN

Roomy Khan made a pile of money trading on inside information. Then she cooperated with the F.B.I. Where does she go from here?

John Cummings (right), the Whitney Plantation's owner and Ibrahima Seck, its director of research, in the Baptist church on the grounds.
Building the First Slavery Museum in America

By DAVID AMSDEN

In Louisiana, a wealthy white lawyer has spent 15 years turning the Whitney Plantation into a museum dedicated to telling the story of slavery.

Obituaries
Anthony Mason of the Knicks pulling down a rebound in front of Horace Grant of the Chicago Bulls during a game in 1992.
Anthony Mason, Bruising Knicks Forward, Dies at 48

By BRUCE WEBER

Mason, whose muscular play and fearsome court persona helped the Knicks reach the N.B.A. finals in 1994, was an unlikely success story.

. Photographs  Slide Show: A Gritty Fan Favorite
Yasar Kemal in 2011.
Yasar Kemal, Master Turkish Novelist and Strident Political Critic, Is Dead

By STEPHEN KINZER

Mr. Kemal repeatedly clashed with the Turkish state while emerging as his country's first novelist of global stature.

William Thomas McKinley before the New York premiere of one of his clarinet concertos in 1985 at Alice Tully Hall.
William Thomas McKinley, Jazz-Loving Composer, Dies at 76

By MARGALIT FOX

A hallmark of Mr. McKinley's music was his acute sensitivity to the tonal possibilities of each instrument.

Editorials
The Supreme Court

Editorial

The Phony Legal Attack on Health Care

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

King v. Burwell, which could tear a huge hole in the Affordable Care Act, is a marvel of reverse-engineered absurdity.

Governor Scott Walker of Wisconsin, left, and Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey.

Editorial

Governors Can Run, but They Can't Hide

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

A state record leaves those jostling for the presidential nomination wide open to criticism.

Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, left, and President Obama.

Editorial

Protecting Fragile Retirement Nest Eggs

By THE EDITORIAL BOARD

Effective rules imposing a fiduciary duty on all retirement account advisers should quickly be put in place.

Op-Ed

Op-Ed Columnist

Did Israel Put Money Over Justice?

By ROGER COHEN

A Jewish family whose son was killed feels betrayed.

. Columnist Page

Op-Ed Columnist

Despicable Us

By FRANK BRUNI

There are embarrassments and errors in our political reporting. We should change our ways.

. Columnist Page
Hillary and the Machine

By ROSS DOUTHAT

The Democratic Party has been unusually united, but hanging together has its downsides.

. Columnist Page
Sunday Review
A Shell gasoline station in Houston, Feb. 19.

Opinion

As Oil Prices Fall, Houston Shudders

By MIMI SWARTZ

America's energy hub prays for the cost of gasoline to rise.


Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Massachusetts Democrat, speaking on Jan. 21 on Capitol Hill.Working Families Party Calls on Elizabeth Warren to Run for President

By ALEXANDER BURNS

With a vote on Sunday, the organization became the latest liberal group to back the Massachusetts senator as a potential primary challenger to former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

 

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